Operating existing wind projects represents a growing part of the U.S. wind industry and offers new business opportunities. When properly maintained and operated, wind turbines can provide large amounts of power, cleanly and reliably, at prices competitive with any other new electricity source. Operations and maintenance, safety management systems, and other project reliability activities are critical elements impacting the sector.

Operations and Maintenance Subcommittee and Working Groups

AWEA's Operations & Maintenance (O&M) Subcommittee and its working groups provide a forum for members to network, share information and develop the industry standards. The committees develop recommended practices for effective operation and maintenance procedures, and ensure education and technician training programs deliver the essential knowledge and skills needed for wind projects. AWEA members are invited to participate on committees. Contact us at om@awea.org to join the O&M Committee.

Excellence in Operations Award

The AWEA Excellence in Operations Award recognizes an individual, a company, or a wind farm for excellence in efficient and effective operation of a wind farm collaborating with others in the wind industry to improve the quality of O&M services. The Excellence in Operations Award is presented at the annual AWEA Wind Project O&M and Safety Conference.

 

AWEA Operations and Maintenance Recommended Practices

These recommended practices are the creation of dozens of expert wind project operators, engineers, technicians, and designers who have teamed up to provide state-of-the-art guidance on the operation and maintenance of modern wind turbines and projects. The recommended practices are available online at the AWEA Bookstore.

Results: 1 - 12 of 26
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ANSI/AWEA 61400 Part 27-1 Electrical Simulation Models - Wind Turbines

Format: PDF
Number of pages: 100

List Price: $375.00
Member Price: $249.00 (ANSI price $300.00)

This American National Standard (ANS) ANSI/AWEA Standard 61400-27-1 is an identical adoption of IEC 61400-27-1 Electrical Simulation Models - Wind Turbines.  This standard defines standard electrical simulation models for wind turbines and wind power plants. The specified models are time domain positive sequence simulation models, intended to be used in power system and grid stability analyses. The models are applicable for dynamic simulations of short term stability in power systems. IEC 61400-27 includes procedures for validation of the specified electrical simulation models. The validation procedure for IEC 61400-27 is based on tests specified in IEC 61400-21.

Disclaimer: This document is proprietary and its use is subject to a legally binding license agreement and disclaimer (the "Agreement") which can be found online at: https://www.awea.org/ANSI-61400-27, as it may be updated from time to time.

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ANSI/AWEA 61400-11 Acoustic Noise Measurement Techniques

Format: PDF
Number of pages: 61

AWEA Standard 61400-11 AWEA 61400-11 Acoustic Noise Measurement Techniques is an identical adoption of IEC 61400-11. This standard presents measurement procedures that enable noise emissions of a wind turbine to be characterized. This involves using measurement methods appropriate to noise emission assessment at locations close to the machine, in order to avoid errors due to sound propagation, but far enough away to allow for the finite source size. The procedures described are different in some respects from those that would be adopted for noise assessment in community noise studies. They are intended to facilitate characterization of wind turbine noise with respect to a range of wind speeds and directions. Standardization of measurement procedures will also facilitate comparisons between different wind turbines.

Once you complete your purchase, AWEA will send you an individual watermarked, digital copy for your use.

Disclaimer: This document is proprietary and its use is subject to a legally binding license agreement and disclaimer (the "Agreement") which can be found online at: https://www.awea.org/ANSI-61400-11, as it may be updated from time to time.

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ANSI/AWEA 61400-12-1-2016 Power Performance Measurements of Electricity Producing Wind Turbines

Power performance measurements of electricity producing wind turbines (ANSI/AWEA 61400-12-1-2016)

 

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ANSI/AWEA 61400-13 Measurement of Mechanical Loads

Format: PDF
Number of pages: 109

AWEA Standard 61400-13 Measurement of Mechanical Loads is an identical adoption of IEC 61400. This standard deals with mechanical load measurements on wind turbines and mainly focuses on large (>40 m2) electricity generating horizontal axis wind turbines. However, the methods described might be applicable to other wind turbines as well (for example, mechanical water pumpers, vertical axis turbines). The object of this specification is to describe the methodology and corresponding techniques for the experimental determination of the mechanical loading on wind turbines. This technical specification is intended to act as a guide for carrying out measurements used for verification of codes and/or for direct determination of the structural loading. This specification is not only intended as one coherent measurement specification but can also be used for more limited measurement campaigns.

Once you complete your purchase, AWEA will send you an individual watermarked, digital copy for your use.

Disclaimer: This document is proprietary and its use is subject to a legally binding license agreement and disclaimer (the "Agreement") which can be found online at: https://www.awea.org/ANSI-61400-13, as it may be updated from time to time.

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ANSI/AWEA 61400-23 Full Scale Structural Testing of Rotor Blades

Format: PDF
Number of pages: 48

AWEA Standard 61400-23 Full Scale Structural Testing of Rotor Blades is an identical adoption of IEC 61400-23:2014. This standard defines the requirements for full-scale structural testing of wind turbine blades and for the interpretation and evaluation of achieved test results. The standard focuses on aspects of testing related to an evaluation of the integrity of the blade, for use by manufacturers and third party investigators. The following tests are considered in this standard: static load tests, fatigue tests, static load tests after fatigue tests, and tests determining other blade properties. The purpose of the tests is to confirm to an acceptable level of probability that the whole population of a blade type fulfils the design assumptions.

Once you complete your purchase, AWEA will send you an individual watermarked, digital copy for your use.

Disclaimer: This document is proprietary and its use is subject to a legally binding license agreement and disclaimer (the "Agreement") which can be found online at: https://www.awea.org/ANSI-61400-23, as it may be updated from time to time.

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Arc Flash Analysis Recommendation

The AWEA Enclosed and Confined Spaces Whitepaper is a guidance document created by the AWEA Environmental, Health and Safety Committee to assist Wind Energy employers in developing their confined/enclosed spaces program.

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AWEA Introduction to Safety: Wind Energy

AWEA Introduction to Safety: Wind Energy is a training program developed by the American Wind Energy Association Environmental Safety and Health Committee to assist managers in the industry conduct the OSHA General Industry 10-Hour Outreach Training. Your trainees will come away with a complete understanding of OSHA, wind site operation hazards and warning signs, risk mitigation, emergency response planning, how to reduce work place injuries, and much more. This 10-hour training program is essential to keep your team up to date on the health and safety standards and best practices. This release contains everything necessary for the conducting the program:

   - 11 Lessons in PowerPoint format
   - Pretests and Posttests
   - Instructor Guide
   - Instructor Lesson Plan
   - Participant Guide
   - Participant Lesson Plan
   - Student Handouts
   - OSHA documents
   - Sample forms

Published: November 2013
Format: Pre-loaded USB drive

Lessons included:

   - Introduction to OSHA
   - Walking-Working Surfaces (including Fall Protection)
   - Exit Routes, Emergency Action Plans, Fire Prevention Plans, and Fire Protection
   - Electrical
   - Personal Protective Equipment
   - Hazard Communication
   - Material Handling
   - Safety and Health Programs
   - Ergonomics
   - Fall Protection
   - Confined Space

By purchasing this product you are agreeing to abide by all terms and conditions outlined in the Disclaimer and Legal Notices.

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Best Practice Guidelines for Offshore Wind Energy

The AWEA Environmental, Health, and Safety Committee created this guidance document to assist offshore wind energy employers with the development of the health and safety program for offshore wind energy.

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Defining Quality in an O&M Context

The value of generation assets is the product of several factors, including the resource quality, the tangible value of the physical assets, and the efficiency with which the assets are operated. The outcome of these factors is a cash flow for the owners and stakeholders. Maximizing the value requires minimizing risk related to these factors. The efficiency with which the assets are operated is dependent on both the quality of the team assembled to do the work and the systems and programs in place to govern them.
Defining Quality in an Operations and Maintenance (O&M) Context focuses on the structure, processes, programs, and controls used by successful companies within the wind industry. The purpose of these systems is aimed to maximize fleet performance and to minimize risk through the implementation of an effective quality program.

Regardless of the specifics of how a program is implemented, there will be a few program commonalities, including a set of common goals specifically focused around quality with processes in place to support them, committed resources assigned to execute the program, and a capability and desire to capture and use data to drive improvement.

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Enclosed Spaces and Confined Spaces in the Wind Industry

The AWEA Enclosed and Confined Spaces Whitepaper is a guidance document created by the AWEA Environmental, Health and Safety Committee to assist Wind Energy employers in developing their confined/enclosed spaces program.

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Evaluating Your O&M Provider's Quality Program

There are many factors that influence an owner when choosing an O&M service provider.  Price certainly plays the largest role for many. Past history, and therefore familiarity, with the service provider is important as well. Their safety record is increasingly becoming an important toll gate. But what about the providers quality management system? After all, a well-defined and functioning quality management system (QMS) is just that, a management system, and touches all areas of the company from training to records to even the company’s safety program.

From a broad industry perspective, many owners fall short when evaluating their existing or potential service providers QMS.

This webinar will define the primary elements of a good QMS as well as give practical guidelines for the decision makers who are involved with choosing a new service provider, or evaluating an existing one for an additional project or to extend their service agreement.

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Guidelines for Qualified and Unqualified Electrical Workers

This guidance document provided suggested guidance for the development of personnel for the position of Qualified Electrical Worker (QEW) within the US wind Industry.